Vacuum distillation

Some of the botanicals take a detour through a glass vacuum. The low temperature distillation of the glass still ensures the most fragile flavours of the Hepple botanicals are preserved and the exceptional delicacy of the gin is forged at this stage.

Finally all these elements are precisely blended with water from the spring next to the distillery and then it is left to rest for at least a month. The unique gin-making method allows botanicals to ring through with great clarity individually and in exceptional harmony together.

It takes five times longer to make Hepple gin than conventional methods, but Hepple is anything but conventional. It is the taste that matters, and as no other gin is made like it, no other gin can taste quite like it.

BOTANICALS

Green Juniper The green juniper in our gin comes from the Hepple estate. Unripe green berries have a very fresh ‘green’ taste whilst also offering up unique ‘woody notes’ of sandalwood and cedar. Picking our green juniper is rather less straightforward than for other botanicals, each individual bush varying in readiness at any given time. We harvest from late August to November.        

Green Juniper


The green juniper in our gin comes from the Hepple estate. Unripe green berries have a very fresh ‘green’ taste whilst also offering up unique ‘woody notes’ of sandalwood and cedar.
Picking our green juniper is rather less straightforward than for other botanicals, each individual bush varying in readiness at any given time. We harvest from late August to November.

 

 

 

 

Amalfi Lemon This lemon from the South West coast of Italy is famous for it highly perfumed and delicate fragrance. It’s floral notes offer a wonderful ‘lift’ over other lemons whilst also giving us consistency in flavour.

Amalfi Lemon


This lemon from the South West coast of Italy is famous for it highly perfumed and delicate fragrance. It’s floral notes offer a wonderful ‘lift’ over other lemons whilst also giving us consistency in flavour.

DOUGLAS FIR This conifer is actually not a true fir but a pine. It is planted for it’s excellent timber and grows in abundance at Hepple. The needles however are of particular interest to us. Picked and rubbed in the hands, smelt then nibbled the fresh needles have a strong resemblance to grapefruit in both scent and taste. Once dried the needles change their character offering a perfume and flavour of strawberry and melted candy. We seek out both these characteristics of fresh and dried. We harvest the needles in September.  

DOUGLAS FIR


This conifer is actually not a true fir but a pine. It is planted for it’s excellent timber and grows in abundance at Hepple.
The needles however are of particular interest to us. Picked and rubbed in the hands, smelt then nibbled the fresh needles have a strong resemblance to grapefruit in both scent and taste. Once dried the needles change their character offering a perfume and flavour of strawberry and melted candy. We seek out both these characteristics of fresh and dried. We harvest the needles in September.

 

Lovage A herb once fairly well known in the British cookery any widespread use in the kitchen now mainly found in Scandinavia. Related to celery the taste and perfume is however more complex with a strong savoury, curry like twang in its leaf. Due to its lively character small amounts are used in our recipe, but is essential for the complimentary links it makes to the other ingredients.

Lovage


A herb once fairly well known in the British cookery any widespread use in the kitchen now mainly found in Scandinavia.
Related to celery the taste and perfume is however more complex with a strong savoury, curry like twang in its leaf. Due to its lively character small amounts are used in our recipe, but is essential for the complimentary links it makes to the other ingredients.

Bog Myrtle Perhaps lacking the prettiest name bog myrtle or Myrica-Gale has a deep and pungent eucalyptus scent and taste, alongside strong notes of bay leaf – a rich perfume altogether. It grows profusely around the distillery and is essential for the base ‘scaffolding’ of our gin. We use only a small amount of this plant in the recipe due to its extraordinary potency. To Myrica gale or sweet gale, as we call it, is ascribed many health benefits; not least its apparent ability to excite the friskier parts of man and woman alike. The leaves are harvested in early July.  

Bog Myrtle


Perhaps lacking the prettiest name bog myrtle or Myrica-Gale has a deep and pungent eucalyptus scent and taste, alongside strong notes of bay leaf – a rich perfume altogether. It grows profusely around the distillery and is essential for the base ‘scaffolding’ of our gin. We use only a small amount of this plant in the recipe due to its extraordinary potency. To Myrica gale or sweet gale, as we call it, is ascribed many health benefits; not least its apparent ability to excite the friskier parts of man and woman alike. The leaves are harvested in early July.

 

Blackcurrant Leaf The blackcurrant leaf provides a remarkable offering. Picked and then dried before distillation its taste is faintly sour with a bright and clean freshness. More important is the quenching  ‘chewiness’ that it lends to the mouthfeel.

Blackcurrant Leaf


The blackcurrant leaf provides a remarkable offering. Picked and then dried before distillation its taste is faintly sour with a bright and clean freshness. More important is the quenching  ‘chewiness’ that it lends to the mouthfeel.